It May Be Time For A Change

It looks like you answered some questions yes that probably mean you should evaluate things a bit.

For the most part, this test from Alcoholics Anonymous is nonsense. The vast majority of people have felt remorse from drinking, or have had a couple drinks to gain the confidence to take part in a party or talk to someone, and that does not make them an alcoholic. It makes them normal.

But when we start losing time at work, stop caring about our families, or we’re losing drive in our lives due to the amount we’re drinking, it’s time to step back and consider whether or not it’s time to seek some help. It’s time to take back the life you deserve.

If and when you do decide to  look into getting help for your drinking, here are a few tips to keep yourself out of the “disease” culture.

If You Hear 12-Step, Run

The thing about 12-step programs like Alcoholics Anonymous isn’t only that they believe you have a disease that you don’t have, or that it is a flat-out dangerous culture, especially for women, but also that it just doesn’t work. The statistics show a 5-10% success rate for AA, and the failure of AA to help 95 out of 100 people isn’t seen by our culture as a failure of the program, but a failure of the participant.

12-Step would be a joke if their failure wasn’t so serious.

You’re Not Sick… with ANYTHING

Here’s another thing to keep in mind when you’re looking for help. You’re not sick. Now, an increasing number of treatment centers will tell you they don’t believe alcoholism is a disease (and then teach you 12-Step, which teaches you alcoholism is a disease). You have to be on the lookout for something more, though. The first thing a treatment center has to do is diagnose you with some type of medical condition. This isn’t for your benefit… it’s so that your insurance will pay them. If they say nothing’s medically wrong with you, insurance companies have no obligation to pay for your stay, so it behooves the center to say you’re clinically depressed, have schizophrenia, whatever it takes to convince you you need to stay for as long as possible, and force the insurance companies to pay for it.